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Mc Llamas Curates The Tribe An Exhibition Celebrating Women In Art

Born and raised in Paris, MC Llamas moved to London to embark on a journey to expand her horizon and her understanding of the arts. As well as being a curator, Llamas is an artist; her work focuses on societal issues associated within contemporary news and developments.

MC Llamas

I love connecting people, and with that in mind, I love the stories that works of art can tell on their own and curated together. The possibilities for the multiplication of narratives are endless

MC Llamas

We managed to speak with Llamas during her recent curated exhibition titled “The Tribe”, which celebrates women in art across three dedicated spaces as part of Art Below’s “Art in the Age of Now” at Fulham Town Hall. 

The Tribe is on until 20th June as part of Art Below’s Art in the Age of Now at Fulham Town Hall. 

Featuring artists 

Holly Allan, Pauline Amos, Edie Baker, Kiera Bennett, Elodie Carrel, Arietta Chandris, Catherine Eldridge, Abigail Fallis, Nancy Fouts, Jessica st James, Chloe Karayiannis, Bip Ling, Jil Mandeng, Marion Mandeng, Sarah Maple, Savannah Mcmillan, Tuesday Riddell and Nettie Wakefield.

Q: For those who don’t know you, can you please introduce yourself?

A: I’m MC Llamas; I’m a curator and artist. I have a background in Fine Art, having studied at City and Guilds of London Art school, and spent summers at Charles Cecil in Florence. But I have also been curating shows since I was pretty young, whilst being an art student.

MC Llamas – Graffiti Head-
2016 Marker pen on paper 21x13cm
Q: What is your inspiration, and why do you do what you do?

A: I love connecting people, and with that in mind, I love the stories that works of art can tell on their own and curated together. The possibilities for the multiplication of narratives are endless when looking at art.

Q: Can you tell us more about your curating process?

A: My curation process often starts with a single piece of work or an idea for a theme, which then develops and grows through the addition of other works.

Abigail Fallis’s Banana Stack Commissioned by MC Llamas for ‘The Tribe’
Q: Can you tell us the motivation behind the Female Rooms?

A: Initially, the curation started with a theme involved in the uncanny, with monochromatic artworks that were quite eerie and mysterious. The second room was developed around Abigail Fallis’s Banana Stack, which has undeniable art historical references mixed with a sexual pun. The third room is filled with works that myself and Pauline Amos created, a dear friend of mine, who was my bubble during the lockdown.

Q: How did you go about the selecting artists the Female Rooms and why did you feel this set of artists was best to express your exhibition theme?

A: Many of the artists whose works I selected for this show I had worked with previously and have also been saving artists I wanted to work with on Instagram, waiting to see when the best time to curate them would be.

Nettie Wakefield – Reverse Portrait
Q: In your opinion, what is the lasting impact of an Art Exhibition, and what does Art mean to you?

A: I hope that visitors leave the show feeling inspired and excited, and I think the Fulham Town Hall show will have done that. There was such great energy and enthusiasm around it.

Q: What’s next for you as an curator?

A: I have been working with a great new pub called The Hawk’s Nest, working on a lineup of monthly rotating shows. I love working with spaces that are not one’s idea of a ‘normal’ exhibition space. I think it creates an extra layer of excitement in the discovery of the works.

https://www.instagram.com/mc.llamas/

©2021 MC Llamas

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